The School of Politics and Global Studies holds frequent lectures featuring faculty, graduate students and visiting scholars. The workshop is run by a faculty member and is an Internal Speaker Series meant to help graduate students.

Colloquium Chair: Tim Peterson, Timothy.M.Peterson@asu.edu

School Workshops: José Kaire at kaire@asu.edu

W. Miller Jr. Faculty Colloq.: Margaret Hanson, margaret.c.hanson@asu.edu

If you want to present at the School Workshop, please contact the coordinator.

Watch past lectures on our YouTube channel

Listed below are upcoming lectures within the School of Politics and Global Studies. Key: Center on the Future of War (CFW), Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research (CLAPR), and Workshop (WS)

Fall 2021

"Heroes and Villains: The Effects of Combat Heroism on Autocratic Values and Nazi Collaboration in France"

Date: August 27

Time: 3:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Pauline Grosjean

(Political Economy Seminar)

Pauline Grosjean, Professor of Economics at University of New South Wales, will give the first Political Economy Working Group seminar of this semester, as previously scheduled.

Freedom and Democracy Since 9/11: Freedom and Democracy at Home (CSRC and CFW)

Date: September 8

Time: 11:00am

Location: Zoom

Recording on YouTube

Speaker: Anand Gopal, Craig Calhoun, and Rozina Ali; moderated by John Carlson

( Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, in conjunction with the Center on the Future of War)

Perhaps no other event in the last twenty years has had more enduring and global repercussions than the attacks of 9/11. In response, the United States restructured the federal government, passed the USA Patriot Act, and launched the global war on terror that extended to Afghanistan, Iraq and countless other countries. “Freedom” and “democracy” served as the rallying cries of such efforts, especially in response to terrorists portrayed as enemies who “hate our freedoms.” Twenty years later, America’s—and Americans’—commitments to freedom and democracy, both at home and abroad, warrant renewed reflection and deeper scrutiny.

On the twentieth anniversary of the September 11 attacks, the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, in conjunction with the Center on the Future of War, is sponsoring a two-part conversation on the legacy and lessons of 9/11. These panels will give particular attention to how the forces of nationalism, populism, isolationism, and nativism have shaped—and are shaping—Americans’ lives and the nation’s engagement in the world. Throughout, religion has occupied a central yet always varied place in the reaction to, and analysis of, these pivotal events and influential forces.


The first panel will consider whether and how the promise and pursuit of freedom and democracy in the United States has changed since 9/11. What do Americans mean by these terms and did U.S. responses to 9/11 undermine commitments to freedom and democracy, and if so, how? Is there a connection between the way we conceived freedom and democracy post-9/11 and the way these ideals are used today? Given the threats we face today—the Covid pandemic, the January 6 insurrection, restrictions against voting rights, and the rise of extremist hate groups—what does the future of freedom and democracy in the US look like ? What is the role religion has played—and will play—as the struggle for religion and democracy evolves.

Join John Carlson, interim director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, as he explores these topics with award-winning journalist and research professor Anand Gopal, University Professor of Social Sciences Craig Calhoun, and New York Times Magazine contributing writer Rozina Ali.

Freedom and Democracy Since 9/11: Freedom, Democracy and U.S. Foreign Policy (CSRC and CFW)

Date: September 9

Time: 11:00am

Location: Zoom

Recording on YouTube

Speaker: Anand Gopal, Paul Miller, Heather Hurlburt, and Daniel Rothenberg; moderated by John Carlson

( Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, in conjunction with the Center on the Future of War)

Perhaps no other event in the last twenty years has had more enduring and global repercussions than the attacks of 9/11. In response, the United States restructured the federal government, passed the USA Patriot Act, and launched the global war on terror that extended to Afghanistan, Iraq and countless other countries. “Freedom” and “democracy” served as the rallying cries of such efforts, especially in response to terrorists portrayed as enemies who “hate our freedoms.” Twenty years later, America’s—and Americans’—commitments to freedom and democracy, both at home and abroad, warrant renewed reflection and deeper scrutiny.

On the twentieth anniversary of the September 11 attacks, the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict, in conjunction with the Center on the Future of War, is sponsoring a two-part conversation on the legacy and lessons of 9/11. These panels will give particular attention to how the forces of nationalism, populism, isolationism, and nativism have shaped—and are shaping—Americans’ lives and the nation’s engagement in the world. Throughout, religion has occupied a central yet always varied place in the reaction to, and analysis of, these pivotal events and influential forces.

The second panel will consider how U.S. foreign policy has embraced or forsaken commitments to freedom and democracy so deeply aroused by the September 11 attacks. The recent US withdrawal from Afghanistan is front and center in this conversation. Yet, other US interventions over the last two decades—in Libya, Iraq, Syria, and elsewhere—invite reconsideration of whether and how the United States has been a friend of or foil to freedom, self-determination, and human rights for other peoples. What is the relation of the global war on terror and related efforts to “counter violent extremism” to rising forms of populism, nationalism, and authoritarianism? What do the lessons of Afghanistan, Iraq, and other wars suggest about the future of freedom, democracy, and human rights in the world? Twenty years on from 9/11, what role is religion likely to play in international politics and the struggle for self-determination.

This panel features Paul Miller, professor of practice at Georgetown University's School of Foreign Service, Heather Hurlbut, director of New Models for Policy Change at New America, Daniel Rothenberg, co-director of the Center on the Future of War, and Anand Gopal, author of "No Good Men Among the Living: America, the Taliban, and the War Through Afghan Eyes." The panel will be moderated by John Carlson, interim director of the Center for the Study of Religion and Conflict.

A lecture with Ramona Perez (GHR Hub)

Date: October 7

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Ramona Perez

(Global Human Rights Hub)

A lecture with Kimberly Hogan on LGBTQ+ Trafficking (GHR Hub)

Date: November 8

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Kimberly Hogan

(Global Human Rights Hub)

Book talk: Reimagining the Judiciary: Women’s Representation on High Courts Worldwide (GFL)

Date: November 8

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Valerie Hoekstra, Miki Kittilson, Maria Escobar-Lemmon (Texas A&M), and Alice Kang (University of Nebraska)

(College of Global Futures)

Spring 2021

Brexit from the ground up: Ethnographic perspectives from the Northern Ireland borderzone

Date: January 13

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Thomas M. Wilson, Binghamton University

Recording on YouTube

The School of Politics and Global Studies and the Phoenix Committee on Foreign Relations are co-hosting Dr. Thomas M. Wilson for a virtual talk over Zoom.

Wilson is Professor of Anthropology in Binghamton University, State University of New York. A Visiting Professor in Queens University, Belfast, 2018–2020, in 2019 he was also a Visiting Professor in the University of Eastern Finland and Lund University. He has conducted ethnographic research in Ireland, the UK, Hungary, Canada and the USA, in matters related to European integration, local and national politics and government, alcohol and identity, and international borders. His publications include Borders: Frontiers of Identity, Nation and State (co-author, 1999); Drinking Cultures: Alcohol and Identity (editor, 2005), The Anthropology of Ireland (co-author, 2006); and A Companion to Border Studies (co-editor, 2012).

Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC) Conference 2021

Date: January 22

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research

Anti-Semitism in Comparative Perspective: Recent Trends and Research Frontiers

Date: January 25

Time: 11:00am

Location: Zoom

The Lowe Family Research Workshop

The Utility of Special Operations: Facing Challenges of Great Power Competition and Compound Security (CFW)

Date: Feb 3

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Ike Wilson

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)


Col. (ret) Isaiah Wilson, III, President of Joint Special Operations University and a Professor of Practice in the School of Politics and Global Studies at ASU. Wilson is a master strategist and a leading advocate of change in America’s approaches to security and defense policy as well as a decorated combat veteran with multiple tours in Afghanistan and Iraq. He has a Ph.D. in political science from Cornell University and was a Professor and academic program director at West Point, where he created the West Point Grand Strategy Program. Wilson’s research focuses on US strategy, military planning, and special operations. He is the author of  Thinking beyond War: Civil Military Relations and Why America Fails to Win the Peace.

Citizenship Reimagined: A New Framework for State Rights in the United States (CLAPR)

Date: February 5

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Allan Colbern and Karthick Ramakrishnan

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research)


Allan Colbern and Karthick Ramakrishnan present their newly released book, Citizenship Reimagined , where they develop a precise framework for understanding and measuring citizenship as expansive, multi-dimensional, and federated - broader than legal status and firmly grounded in the provision of rights. Placing today's immigration battles in historical context, they show that today's progressive state citizenship is not unprecedented: US states have been leaders in rights expansion since America's founding, including over the fight for black citizenship and women's suffrage. Their book invites readers to rethink how American federalism relates to minority rights and how state laws regulating undocumented residents can coexist with federal exclusivity over immigration law.

CareerTalk: Human Rights Watch (CFW and Global Human Rights Hub)

Date: Feb 10

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Sarah Holewinski

(Center on the Future of War and Global Human Rights Hub)


Sarah Holewinski is the Washington Director at Human Rights Watch, and leads the organization’s engagement with the United States government on global human rights issues, with a particular focus on national security and foreign policy. Prior to joining Human Rights Watch, she was the first senior advisor on human rights in the Chairman’s Office at The Joint Staff of the U.S. Department of Defense and, prior, served as deputy chief of staff for policy at the U.S. Mission to the United Nations under Ambassador Samantha Power. For nearly a decade Sarah was executive director of Center for Civilians in Conflict (CIVIC), leading efforts to advise warring parties on civilian protection and responsible use of force. In that role, she worked extensively with the U.S. military and its allies in Afghanistan, Iraq, Somalia, CAR, Burma and elsewhere. Sarah was named in Top 100 Most Influential People in Armed Violence Reduction by Action on Armed Violence and received the Truman National Security Project’s award for Extraordinary Impact. She holds degrees from Georgetown and Columbia Universities, is a member of the Council on Foreign Relations, a senior fellow at New America, a board director at Center for Civilians in Conflict (CIVIC) and an adjunct professor at Georgetown University and a professor of practice at Arizona State University.

Roundtable: The Rise in Anti-Democratic Violence in the U.S.: Perspectives on the Capitol Insurrection

Date: Feb 11

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Recording on YouTube

Speaker: Lenka Bustikova, Jennet Kirkpatrick, Fabian Neuner and Candace Rondeaux

The United States has been shaken by a rise in extremism and anti-democratic violence that culminated in efforts to reverse the results of the presidential election during the deadly insurrection at the Capitol in early January. Join experts from Arizona State University’s School of Politics and Global Studies for a roundtable discussion on the causes and consequences of the Capitol insurrection and the rise of anti-democratic violence in the U.S.

Inside the Walled Garden: Understanding the Chinese Internet (CFW)

Date: Feb 11

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Yi-Ling Liu

(Center on the Future of War)

Yi-Ling Liu, ASU Future Security Fellow at New America, award-winning journalist whose work has appeared in The New York Times Magazine, Harper’s Magazine, Foreign Policy, The Economist, The New Yorker, and elsewhere

The Challenge of Black Patriotism (CFW)

Date: Feb 17

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Ted Johnson

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)


Theodore (Ted) R. Johnson is a Senior Fellow and Director of the Fellows Program at the Brennan Center for Justice. His research and writing focus on black voting behavior and electoral politics, as well as the role of national solidarity in addressing racial inequality. Prior to joining the Brennan Center, Dr. Johnson was a national fellow at the New America, and he is a retired Commander in the United States Navy.

His work has appeared in The Washington Post, The Atlantic, The New York Times Magazine, and several other national publications. His forthcoming book When the Stars Begin to Fall: Overcoming Racism and Renewing the Promise of America will be published by Grove Atlantic in June.

Becoming the State: (Im)migration Control and the Weaponization of Brown Bodies (CLAPR)

Date: Feb 19

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: David Cortez

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

The face of immigration law enforcement has changed significantly in the last quarter-century — with Latinxs, today, comprising nearly thirty-percent of Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) and fifty-percent of Border Patrol. Where scholars have devoted attention to this demographic shift and its implications, research has focused primarily on how Latinx agents negotiate the space between ‘who they are’ as Latinxs and ‘what they do’ as immigration agents. Key to this line of inquiry has been a single, overriding question: do Latinx agents’ ethnic identities matter ? Undoubtedly a question of great import, the resulting debate has centered solely around ‘identity as psychological self-categorization’ — obscuring the role played by the physical bodies of Latinx agents. This research represents a substantive departure from this trajectory. In this talk, I discuss how the state weaponizes Latinx immigration agents’ brown bodies (‘identity as physical, descent-based attributes’) against Latinx (im)migrants. Drawing on thirteen-months of extensive fieldwork, including interviews with one-hundred ICE agents across Arizona, California, and Texas, I demonstrate how the state, embodied in Latinxs, not only gains access to, but disarms the communities it wishes to expel.

More on our speaker:

David Cortez is Assistant Professor of Political Science and Latinx Studies at the University of Notre Dame. Professor Cortez’s research centers on ethnic and racial identity with particular focus on intersectional and situational identity salience. His current book project explores the emergence of a disproportionately-Latinx immigration law enforcement workforce as a metaphor for the minority experience in the United States. Drawing on extensive fieldwork, including interviews with and observations of more than one-hundred Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents across Texas, Arizona, and California, his research engages questions of belonging, obligation, and liminality. His research has been supported by the National Science Foundation and published in the Annual Review of Sociology and Political Research Quarterly.

When Does Resistance Become Insurrection? Free Speech and the Defense of the Republic (CFW)

Date: Feb 23

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Noah Feldman

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)


Noah Feldman, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law, Harvard Law School, author of multiple books, including Cool War: The Future of Global Competition and Divided By God: America's Church-State Problem and What We Should Do About It.

Black History Month Distinguished Lecture: Lewis Gordon, Freedom, Justice and Decolonization

Date: Feb 24

Time: 2:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Lewis Gordon,University of Connecticut

Recording on YouTube

Lewis R. Gordon is Professor and Head of the Department of Philosophy at the University of Connecticut at Storrs; Honorary President of the Global Center for Advanced Studies; Honorary Professor in the Unit for the Humanities at Rhodes University, South Africa; Chairperson of the American Philosophical Association Committee on Public Philosophy; and Chairperson of the Awards Committee and Global Collaborations for the Caribbean Philosophical Association, of which he was the organization’s first president. His books published by Routledge include Fanon and the Crisis of European Man, Existence in Black, Existentia Africana, Disciplinary Decadence, and, with Jane Anna Gordon, Not Only the Master’s Tools and Of Divine Warning.

Book description: The eminent scholar Lewis R. Gordon offers a probing meditation on freedom, justice, and decolonization. What is there to be understood and done when it is evident that the search for justice, which dominates social and political philosophy of the North, is an insufficient approach for the achievements of dignity, freedom, liberation, and revolution? Gordon takes the reader on a journey as he interrogates a trail from colonized philosophy to re-imagining liberation and revolution to critical challenges raised by Afropessimism, theodicy, and looming catastrophe. He offers not forecast and foreclosure but instead an urgent call for dignifying and urgent acts of political commitment. Such movements take the form of examining what philosophy means in Africana philosophy, liberation in decolonial thought, and the decolonization of justice and normative life. Gordon issues a critique of the obstacles to cultivating emancipatory politics, challenging reductionist forms of thought that proffer harm and suffering as conditions of political appearance and the valorization of nonhuman beings. He asserts instead emancipatory considerations for occluded forms of life and the irreplaceability of existence in the face of catastrophe and ruin, and he concludes, through a discussion with the Circassian philosopher and decolonial theorist, Madina Tlostanova, with the project of shifting the geography of reason.

This event is sponsored by:
School of Social Transformation;
Philosophy and the Anti-Racism Committee,
School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies;
College of Integrative Sciences and Arts;
Center for the Study of Race and Democracy;
School of Politics and Global Studies;
School of Humanities, Arts and Cultural Studies

Who is Worthy? Immigrants in a Time of Uncertainty (CLAPR)

Date: March 5

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Maricruz Osorio

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

Maricruz Osorio will examine the puzzle of public opinion support of immigrants and refugees, with focus on competing identities and threat perceptions. Osorio uses the ANES 2016 Pilot Study to investigate how support for US entry of Syrian refugees changes, according to perceptions of the viability of local terrorist threat and other identities. Moreover, she compares support of legal migration and refugee migration to understand if Americans differentiate who is more worthy of US entry. She finds that as respondents believe that a terrorist attack in their area is possible, support for refugees decreases to a greater degree than support for legal immigration. Osorio will further analyze if some refugees have greater support for entry than others. For this, she will use a survey experiment in the 2018 CCES and find that Muslim refugees have less support for entry.

Maricruz Ariana Osorio is a PhD candidate at the University of California, Riverside. Broadly, her work looks at the political engagement and behavior of marginalized groups, with an emphasis on women and immigrants. She has published in this work academically and has contributed to other forms of publicly available scholarship, including policy reports, blogs, and encyclopedia entries. Her dissertation investigates the role of gender in forming risk assessments, whether risks are perceived to be risks themselves or risks are believed to be risks to their community at large. She analyzes how those risk assessments contribute to the political participation, in all its different forms, of marginalized immigrant communities. Her dissertation looks at how agency might manifest differently by citizenship status and hopes to add to our understanding of political participation.

Transnational Feminist Movements (CFW)

Date: March 8

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Pardis Mahdavi and Mi-Ai Parrish

(Center on the Future of War)

2020 was the year that women emerged indisputably as the world’s most successful leaders, from Taiwan President Tsai Ing-wen and New Zealand Prime Minister Jacinda Ardern’s COVID responses to German Chancellor Angela Merkel saving the eurozone and minimizing damage from Brexit. But perhaps more important was the growing success of transnational feminist movements. For more than a decade, networks of women have been sharing resources, media know-how, and strategies across mass movements. Now this transnational work is producing policy breakthroughs and societal shifts, including greater protections for survivors of sexual violence in Guatemala, more reproductive rights and legalized abortion in Chile and Argentina, the decriminalization of homosexuality in India, a crackdown on sexual harassment in South Korea, and the Greta Thunberg-inspired youth movement for stronger climate response everywhere. What is next for these movements, especially in many Middle Eastern and African countries, where progress for women has been incremental? What setbacks have the pandemic and authoritarianism caused for women and social movements?

Pardis Mahdavi, dean of social sciences in Arizona State University’s College of Liberal Arts and Sciences, and Mi-Ai Parrish, managing director of ASU Media Enterprise, visit Zócalo on International Women’s Day to discuss the most promising opportunities right now for transnational women’s movements to save our world.

Introduction by Anne-Marie Slaughter, CEO of New America.

Co-sponsored with the ASU Global Human Rights Hub.

Renewal and Remaking of Democracy (CFW)

Date: March 11

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Craig Calhoun

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

On March 11th, the Center on the Future of War hosted a discussion with Craig Calhoun, ASU University Professor of Social Sciences, former director and president of the London School of Economics and Political Science (LSE), author of many books including the forthcoming Degenerations of Democracy

Extremism, Anti-democratic Violence, and the Second Impeachment Trial: A Conversation with Senator Jeff Flake

Date: March 15

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Senator Jeff Flake

Recording on YouTube

The School of Politics and Global Studies hosted a conversation with former United States Senator Jeff Flake who will speak on the recent rise in anti-democratic violence in the U.S., the Capitol insurrection, and the second impeachment trial of Donald Trump. Senator Flake will be interviewed by SPGS Senior Lecturer and American government expert Dr. Gina Woodall followed by audience Q & A.

Senator Jeff Flake represented Arizona in the House of Representatives from 2001-2013 and in the U.S. Senate from 2013-2019. Senator Flake is currently a distinguished dean fellow with The College of Liberal Arts and Sciences at Arizona State University.

Preventing Atrocity Crimes in a Violent World (CFW)

Date: March 17

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: David Schaeffer

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

David Scheffer  is Director Emeritus of the Center for International Human Rights and was the Mayer Brown/Robert A. Helman Professor of Law at Northwestern Pritzker School of Law. From 2012 to 2018 he was the U.N. Secretary-General’s Special Expert on U.N. Assistance to the Khmer Rouge Trials. From 1997 to 2001, he was the first U.S. Ambassador at Large for War Crimes Issues and led the U.S. delegation in talks establishing the International Criminal Court. Professor Scheffer received the Berlin Prize in 2013 and the Champion of Justice Award of the Center for Justice and Accountability in 2018.  Foreign Policy magazine selected him as a “Top Global Thinker of 2011.” He is Vice-President of the American Society of International Law and the Tom A. Bernstein Genocide Prevention Fellow at the U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum.

Introduction by Stephanie Lindquist, Senior Vice President of Global Academic Initiatives at ASU

Co-sponsored with the ASU Global Human Rights Hub and the Martin-Springer Institute, NAU

Naturalism of freedom of opinion and speech: reflections from overview of the Kazakh customary traditions (WS)

Date: March 24

Time: 11:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Beibit Shangirbayeva

(School Workshop)

A book talk with Lauren Redniss (CFW)

Date: March 25

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Lauren Redniss, Sybil Francis, Steven Teppe

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

The Center for the Future of Arizona, New America, and the Center on the Future of War hosted a talk with Lauren Redniss, 2017 MacArthur "Genius" Grant recipient and New Arizona Fellow at New America, on her new book "Oak Flat: A Fight for Sacred Land in the American West."

Redniss is the author of several works of visual non-fiction, including: “Thunder & Lightning: Weather Past, Present, Future,” winner of the 2016 PEN/E.O. Wilson Literary Science Writing Award and “Radioactive: Marie & Pierre Curie, A Tale of Love and Fallout,” finalist for the National Book Award. She has been a Guggenheim fellow as well as a fellow at the New York Public Library’s Cullman Center for Scholars & Writers.

New Arizona Fellows are members of the Fellows Program at New America, a DC-based think tank, who are supported by the Center for the Future of Arizona to explore the challenges and opportunities facing the State in the 21st century

The event opened with an introduction by Sybil Francis, Ph.D. President and CEO of the Center for the Future of Arizona. The Q&A was moderated by Steven Tepper, Dean of ASU’s Herberger Institute for Design and the Arts.

What's Wrong with Populism?

Date: March 30

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: David Art

Recording on YouTube

The ASU School of Politics and Global Studies hosted Dr. David Art, Professor of Political Science at Tufts University for a virtual talk over Zoom.

The “rise of global populism” has become a primary metanarrative for the previous decade in advanced industrial democracies, but this talk argues it is a deeply misleading one. Nativism—not populism—is the defining feature of both radical right parties in Western Europe and of radical right politicians like Donald Trump in the United States. The tide of “left-wing populism” in Europe receded quickly, as did its promise of returning power to the people through online voting and policy deliberation. The erosion of democracy in states like Hungary has not been the result of populism, but rather of the deliberate practice of competitive authoritarianism. Calling these disparate phenomena “populist” obscures their core features and mistakenly attaches normatively redeeming qualities to nativists and authoritarians.

David Art is a Professor of Political Science at Tufts University. His field is comparative politics, with a regional focus on Europe. Professor Art's research interests include extremist political parties and movements, the politics of history and memory, and comparative historical analysis in the social sciences.

He is the author of Inside the Radical Right: The Development of Anti-Immigrant Parties in Western Europe (Cambridge University Press, 2011) and The Politics of the Nazi Past in Germany and Austria (Cambridge University Press, 2006). His articles have appeared in Comparative Politics, German Politics and Society, Party Politics, and West European Politics.

Global Asymmetries, Digital Extractivism and the Fight for Economic Justice

Date: April 6

Time: 1:00pm - 3:00pm

Location: Zoom

(The Human Economies working group)

'Radical Right Parties and Uncivil Society in Ukraine' (WS)

Date: April 7

Time: 11:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Lenka Bustikova

(School Workshop)

"Taming the Legislature: Pathways to Authoritarian Consolidation in Central Asia" (WS)

Date: April 12

Time: 11:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Margaret Hanson

(School Workshop)

From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration

Date: April 14

Time: 11:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Kiara Boone

This was a talk with Kiara Boone on the Equal Justice Initiative’s racial justice work. This School of Politics and Global Studies event was co-sponsored by the ASU Global Human Rights Hub.

Kiara Boone is the deputy director of community education at the Equal Justice Initiative. In her role, Kiara works with EJI's racial justice projects which are aimed at changing the narrative about America’s history of racial injustice through educational reports, videos, short films, local community efforts, and two new cultural spaces - The Legacy Museum and The National Memorial for Peace and Justice in Montgomery, Alabama. With EJI’s Community Remembrance Project, Kiara helps to support community members across the country to memorialize documented victims of racial violence and foster meaningful dialogue about race and justice today.

"Germany’s Approach to Countering Antisemitism Since Reunification" (WS)

Date: April 21

Time: 11:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Thomas Just

(School Workshop)

Reflection on Latinos in Arizona's University System (CLAPR)

Date: March 22

Time: 3:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Ernest Caldrón

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

Ernest Calderón is a former member of the Arizona Board of Regents and was Arizona’s first Harry S. Truman Scholar receiving that honor in 1977. He has served as an adjunct professor at Northern Arizona University and in the Maricopa County Community College District. A native of Morenci, Arizona and a sixth generation native of what was New Mexico Territory, he is a first-generation college graduate. Ernie’s parents were a copper miner and a cook. He is a graduate of Northern Arizona University, the University of Arizona College of Law and received his doctorate in organizational change and leadership from the University of Southern California. He is an AV Preeminent rated lawyer by Martindale-Hubbell, listed in Best Lawyers in America and is an elected member of the prestigious American Law Institute. Ernie clerked for U.S. District Judge Walter E. Craig and has practiced law 38 years. He served as the first Latino to be elected State Bar of Arizona president and served as president of the Arizona Board of Regents. He led the Grand Canyon Council of the Boy Scouts, the Catholic Community Foundation of the Roman Catholic Diocese of Phoenix and Valley Leadership. Ernie was the Hispanic National Bar Association’s Lawyer of the Year and Phoenix’s Man of the Year. He is a Knight Grand Cross in the Equestrian Order of the Holy Sepulcher of Jerusalem. Ernie has four adult children who are his greatest accomplishment. He and his wife, Terri, live in Phoenix.

The mission of ASU Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research (CLAPR) is to foster and support thoughtful, objective, and innovative research on the political and policy circumstances of the nation’s Latina/o-Hispanic population, thereby creating a fuller, deeper understanding of politics and governance in the United States.  This mission entails facilitating and disseminating research that emphasizes, but is not limited to, empirical and normative theoretical perspectives, historical context, institutional dimensions, and public policy issues which are especially germane to the Latina/o-Hispanic population while also having broad significance for American society and politics.

Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance (CFW)

Date: May 11

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Jude Joffe-Block, Terry Greene Sterling, Sybil Francis

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

The Center for the Future of Arizona, New America, and the Center on the Future of War hosted a talk with Lauren Redniss, 2017 MacArthur "Genius" Grant recipient and New Arizona Fellow at New America, on her new book "Oak Flat: A Fight for Sacred Land in the

Fall 2020

The Democratic Politics of Racist Monument Removal: Failed Proceduralism vs. Effective Rioting (CLAPR)

Date: October 2

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science, Brown University

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

Juliet Hooker is Professor of Political Science at Brown University. She is a political theorist specializing in racial justice, multiculturalism, Latin American political thought, and Black political thought. She is the author of Race and the Politics of Solidarity (Oxford, 2009) and Theorizing Race in the Americas: Douglass, Sarmiento, Du Bois, and Vasconcelos
(Oxford, 2017), which was a recipient of the American Political Science Association’s 2018 Ralph Bunche Book Award and the 2018 Best Book Award of the Race, Ethnicity, and Politics Section of the American Political Science Association. She is currently working on a book project
entitled, Black Grief/White Grievance, that explores the role of loss in contemporary racial politics in the United States.

The War for Gaul: How Julius Caesar’s Ideas on Strategy Can Help Us Face Contemporary Challenges (CFW)

Date: October 6

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: James O’Donnell and Lt. Gen. (ret) Robert Schmidle

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

James O’Donnell, ASU University Librarian and former Provost and University Professor at Georgetown University, discusses his book, The War for Gaul: A New Translation (Princeton 2019). The conversation is guided by LtGen (ret) Robert Schmidle, ASU Professor of Practice, the first Deputy Commander of U.S. Cyber Command, and a combat pilot.

Latina/os and the 2020 Elections: Local, State, and National Perspectives (CLAPR)

Date: October 8

Time: 5:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Eduardo Sainz, Mi Familia Vota; Lisa Magana, ASU; Lisa Sanchez, UA, Louis Desipio, UC Irvine

Recording on YouTube

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

COVID-19 as a ‘Hinge Event’ and Implications for U.S. Security (CFW)

Date: October 14

Time: 4:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Peter L. Bergen, Daniel Rothenberg and Souad Ali

(Center on the Future of War)

James O’Donnell, ASU University Librarian and former Provost and University Professor at Georgetown University, discusses his book, The War for Gaul: A New Translati

The Voting Rights Crisis and the 2020 Presidential Election

Date: October 21

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: David Daley

Recording on YouTube

On October 21st, 2020 the School of Politics and Global Studies is hosted David Daley, a senior fellow for FairVote, for a conversation on voter suppression.

David Daley is the author of the national bestseller "Ratf**ked: Why Your Vote Doesn't Count" and "Unrigged: How Americans Are Battling Back to Save Democracy." His work on voting rights has appeared in the New Yorker, the New York Times, the Atlantic and many other publications. He is a senior fellow at FairVote and the former editor in chief of Salon

Corruption in Context: A question of law or normativity?

Date: October 28

Time: 4:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Nnamdi Igbokwe

Recording on YouTube

What do we really mean by corruption? This talk will contextualize corruption by examining contestations surrounding its definitions, classifications, and typologies.

This talk is part of the "COVID and Corruption" series through Arizona State University's School of Politics and Global Studies which will explore the political economy of corruption amidst the COVID-19 pandemic examining the rise of institutional abuses of power and the renewal of various modes of rent-seeking that have emerged.

Dr. Nnamdi Igbokwe is a political economist whose area of work sits within the tradition of International Political Economy with a focus on Modernization and Development Economics. Dr. Igbokwe’s research explores how disparate development outcomes and conditions like corruption arrive at the intersection of international politics, state institutions, and global economic policy. His regional expertise includes West Africa where he investigates themes like corruption, capitalism, clientelism, liberalism, economic development policy, wealth defense, dictatorship, foreign direct investment, and transnational capital.

Corruption’s Comparative Quagmire

Date: November 10

Time: 4:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Nnamdi Igbokwe

Recording on YouTube

What causes corruption? Can corruption analysis be compared? This talk will discuss extant methods, measurements, and modes of investigating corruption.

This talk is part of the "COVID and Corruption" series through the School of Politics and Global Studies which will explore the political economy of corruption amidst the COVID-19 pandemic examining the rise of institutional abuses of power and the renewal of various modes of rent-seeking that have emerged.

Dr. Nnamdi Igbokwe is a political economist whose area of work sits within the tradition of International Political Economy with a focus on Modernization and Development Economics. Dr. Igbokwe’s research explores how disparate development outcomes and conditions like corruption arrive at the intersection of international politics, state institutions, and global economic policy. His regional expertise includes West Africa where he investigates themes like corruption, capitalism, clientelism, liberalism, economic development policy, wealth defense, dictatorship, foreign direct investment, and transnational capital.

Mobilization for Democracy in East Germany, 1989 to the Present

Date: November 12

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Steve Pfaff

Recording on YouTube

The School of Politics and Global Studies and the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies are co-hosting Dr. Steven J. Pfaff, Professor of Sociology at the University of Washington, for a talk on opposition and repression in the German Democratic Republic. This event is part of the @GermanyinUSA lecture series assisted by the German Embassy in Washington D.C.

https://www.asugermany.com/

Pfaff's research focuses on social and political mobilization, and has won awards from the Social Science History Association and the European Academy of Sociology. He serves on the board of the Association for the Study of Religion, Economics and Culture. His most recent book, The Genesis of Rebellion: Governance, Grievance and Mutiny in the Age of Sail was co-authored with SPGS Foundation Professor Michael Hechter and published this year by Cambridge University Press.

Constitutional Lobbying: Democratic Dualism and the Mobilization of Interest Groups (WS)

Date: November 18

Time: 10:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: James Strickland

Social Pandemic and Institutional Pathology

Date: November 18

Time: 3:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Nnamdi Igbokwe

Recording on YouTube

How has COVID impacted political and economic institutions? This talk will discuss corruption as a direct consequence of the pandemic and explore the institutional aftermath of rent-seeking and power abuse.

This talk is part of the "COVID and Corruption" series through the School of Politics and Global Studies which will explore the political economy of corruption amidst the COVID-19 pandemic examining the rise of institutional abuses of power and the renewal of various modes of rent-seeking that have emerged.

Dr. Nnamdi Igbokwe is a political economist whose area of work sits within the tradition of International Political Economy with a focus on Modernization and Development Economics. Dr. Igbokwe’s research explores how disparate development outcomes and conditions like corruption arrive at the intersection of international politics, state institutions, and global economic policy. His regional expertise includes West Africa where he investigates themes like corruption, capitalism, clientelism, liberalism, economic development policy, wealth defense, dictatorship, foreign direct investment, and transnational capital.

Diversity in National Security: How to Ensure More Women Hold Leadership Positions (CFW)

Date: November 18

Time: 5:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Heather Hurlburt, Jeannette Haynie and Camille Stewart

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

The event addresses current challenges with diversity in U.S. national security, outlining specific ways to ensure greater women’s representation in civilian and military leadership positions with Heather Hurlburt, Laura Kupe, and Jeannette Haynie.

Hurlburt is Director of New America’s New Models of Policy Change a former senior staffer in the White House and Department of State. Kupe is Counsel on the Committee on Homeland Security, former Special Assistant at the Department of Homeland Security and Youth Ambassador for Women of Color Advancing Peace, Security, and Conflict Transformation. And, Haynie is a former Marine Corps officer with a PhD in International Relations and Founder and Executive Director of the Athena Leadership Project, which seeks to elevate the stories of female veterans and conduct research into how gender-diverse teams and leadership impact national security.

Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany: Lessons for the United States

Date: November 19

Time: 1:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Daniel Ziblatt

Recording on YouTube

The School of Politics and Global Studies and the School of Historical, Philosophical and Religious Studies are co-hosting Dr. Daniel Ziblatt as part of the @GermanyinUSA lecture series assisted by the German Embassy in Washington D.C.

Daniel Ziblatt is Eaton Professor of Government at Harvard University and director of the Transformations of Democracy group at the WZB Berlin Social Science Center. He specializes in the study of Europe and the history of democracy. His three books include "How Democracies Die" (Crown, 2018), co-authored with Steve Levitsky), a New York Times best-seller and der Spiegel best-seller (Germany) and translated into twenty two languages. He is also the author of "Conservative Parties and the Birth of Democracy" (Cambridge University Press, 2017), an account of Europe's historical democratization, which won the American Political Science Association's 2018 Woodrow Wilson Prize for the best book in government and international relations and American Sociological Association's 2018 Barrington Moore Prize. His first book was an analysis of 19th century state building, "Structuring the State: The Formation of Italy and Germany and the Puzzle of Federalism" (Princeton, 2006).

Evaluating Social Norms and Tolerance in the Trump Era (WS)

Date: December 2

Time: 10:30am

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Fabian Neuner and Mark Ramirez

What Now? The Future of the JCPOA and the Iranian Nuclear Program (CFW)

Date: December 2

Time: 5:30pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Joe Brazda

Recording on YouTube

(Center on the Future of War)

A livestream discussion with Joe Brazda, an affiliated expert on nonproliferation at CRDF Global headquartered in Washington D.C. Mr. Brazda spent several years researching, writing and lecturing on topics such as Iran, DPRK, nuclear weapons and delivery systems at the James Martin Center for Nonproliferation Studies. Additionally, he has worked for the Center for Global Security Research at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory and the IAEA in Vienna, Austria. Brazda discussed the future of the Joint Comprehensive Plan of Action (JCPOA) and the Iranian nuclear program within the context of a changing Middle East, significant political uncertainty and shifting international and regional commitments.

Spring 2020

PRIEC

Date: January 24

(Center for Latina/os & American Politics Research)

Kramer Lecture: "Racial Profiling in US Traffic Stops: Assessing the Evidence"

Date: February 21

Time: 2:45pm

Location: CDN 60

Speaker: Frank Baumgartner

Event recap on ASU News

(ASU Pi Sigma Alpha Kramer Lecture)

Professor Baumgartner has written extensively on the topics of public policy, lobbying, and framing in both US and comparative perspectives. His most recent book is Suspect Citizens (Cambridge, 2018), focusing on racial differences in the outcomes of routine traffic stops. In 2019 he was recognized with the C. Herman Pritchett Best Book Award from the Law and Courts Section of the American Political Science Association (for Suspect Citizens), and with the Lijphart/Przeworski/ Verba Dataset Award from the APSA Section on Comparative Politics (for the Comparative Agendas Project).

"Terrorism and Democratic Backsliding: A Case Study of South Asia"

Date: February 19

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Chirasree Mukherjee

"Cabinets, Ministers, and Gender"

Date: March 6

Time: 10300pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Susan Fransechet

"Refugee Camps as Climate Traps?: Current and Future Climate Marginality at One Thousand Refugee Camps"

Date: Postponed

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 5536

Speaker: Jamon Van Den Hoek

Distinguished Alumni Talk

Date: Postponed

Time:

Location:

Speaker: Robert Bond

"Misperception, Redistribution, and Transparency: Does Transparency Increase Redistribution?"

Date: April 8

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Zoom

Speaker: Haeyong Lim

Warren Miller Jr. Colloquium

Date: Postponed

Time:

Location:

Speaker: Milan Svolik (Yale)

Fall 2019

"More Women Can Lobby: Explaining Gender Diversity Among Lobbyists in the U.S. States"

Date: September 4

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: James Strickland

"Individual Preferences on Pro-Western Foreign Policy Orientation: The Evidence from the South Caucasus"

Date: September 18

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Namig Abbasov

"Naming Evil: The Meaning, Value and Usefulness of Genocide in International Law"

Date: October 16

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Daniel Rothenberg

Corruption and Governance in Authoritarian Regimes

Date: November 6

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Margaret Hanson

Effects of Anomie and Cultural Distance on Public Attitudes toward Territorial Integrity: Evidence from the South Caucasus

Date: November 20

Time: 12:00pm

Location: Coor 6607

Speaker: Valery Dzutsati

Past Workshops & Lectures

Spring 2021

Date Speaker Title Time Location
13-Jan Thomas M. Wilson, Binghamton University Brexit from the ground up: Ethnographic perspectives from the Northern Ireland borderzone 12:00pm Zoom
22-Jan Center for Latina/os and American Politics Research Politics of Race, Immigration, and Ethnicity Consortium (PRIEC) Conference 2021 8:45am - 3:10pm Zoom
25-Jan The Lowe Family Research Workshop Anti-Semitism in Comparative Perspective: Recent Trends and Research Frontiers Zoom
3-Feb Ike Wilson The Utility of Special Operations: Facing Challenges of Great Power Competition and Compound Security (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
5-Feb Allan Colbern and Karthick Ramakrishnan Citizenship Reimagined: A New Framework for State Rights in the United States (CLAPR) 12:00pm Zoom
10-Feb Sarah Holewinski CareerTalk: Human Rights Watch (CFW and Global Human Rights Hub) 12:00pm Zoom
11-Feb Lenka Bustikova, Jennet Kirkpatrick, Fabian Neuner and Candace Rondeaux Roundtable: The Rise in Anti-Democratic Violence in the U.S.: Perspectives on the Capitol Insurrection 12:00pm Zoom
11-Feb Yi-Ling Liu Inside the Walled Garden: Understanding the Chinese Internet (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
17-Feb Ted Johnson The Challenge of Black Patriotism (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
19-Feb David Cortez Becoming the State: (Im)migration Control and the Weaponization of Brown Bodies (CLAPR) 1:00pm Zoom
23-Feb Noah Feldman When Does Resistance Become Insurrection? Free Speech and the Defense of the Republic (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
24-Feb Lewis Gordon,University of Connecticut Black History Month Distinguished Lecture: Lewis Gordon, Freedom, Justice and Decolonization 2:00pm Zoom
5-Mar Maricruz Osorio Who is Worthy? Immigrants in a Time of Uncertainty (CLAPR) 1:00pm Zoom
8-Mar Pardis Mahdavi and Mi-Ai Parrish Transnational Feminist Movements (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
11-Mar  Craig Calhoun Renewal and Remaking of Democracy (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
15-Mar Senator Jeff Flake Extremism, Anti-democratic Violence, and the Second Impeachment Trial: A Conversation with Senator Jeff Flake 12:00pm Zoom
17-Mar David Schaeffer Preventing Atrocity Crimes in a Violent World (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
24-Mar Beibit Shangirbayeva Naturalism of freedom of opinion and speech: reflections from overview of the Kazakh customary traditions 11:30am Zoom
25-Mar Lauren Redniss, Sybil Francis, Steven Tepper A book talk with Lauren Redniss (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
30-Mar David Art What's Wrong with Populism? 12:00pm Zoom
6-Apr The Human Economies working group Global Asymmetries, Digital Extractivism and the Fight for Economic Justice 1:00pm to 3:00pm Zoom
7-Apr Lenka Bustikova  'Radical Right Parties and Uncivil Society in Ukraine' (WS) 11:30am Zoom
12-Apr Margaret Hanson  "Taming the Legislature: Pathways to Authoritarian Consolidation in Central Asia" (WS) 11:30am Zoom
14-Apr Kiara Boone From Enslavement to Mass Incarceration 12:00pm Zoom
21-Apr Thomas Just "Germany’s Approach to Countering Antisemitism Since Reunification" (WS) 11:30am Zoom
22-Apr Ernest Caldrón Reflection on Latinos in Arizona's University System (CLAPR) 3:00pm Zoom
11-May Jude Joffe-Block, Terry Greene Sterling, Sybil Francis Driving While Brown: Sheriff Joe Arpaio versus the Latino Resistance (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom

Fall 2020

Date Speaker Title Time Location
2-Oct Juliet Hooker, Professor of Political Science, Brown University The Democratic Politics of Racist Monument Removal: Failed Proceduralism vs. Effective Rioting  (CLAPR) 1:00pm Zoom
6-Oct James O’Donnell and Lt. Gen. (ret) Robert Schmidle The War for Gaul: How Julius Caesar’s Ideas on Strategy Can Help Us Face Contemporary Challenges (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom
8-Oct Eduardo Sainz, Mi Familia Vota; Lisa Magana, ASU; Lisa Sanchez, UA, Louis Desipio, UC Irvine Latina/os and the 2020 Elections: Local, State, and National Perspectives (CLAPR) 5:00pm Zoom
14-Oct Peter L. Bergen, Daniel Rothenberg and Souad Ali COVID-19 as a ‘Hinge Event’ and Implications for U.S. Security (CFW) 4:30pm Zoom
21-Oct David Daley The Voting Rights Crisis and the 2020 Presidential Election 12:00pm Zoom
28-Oct Nnamdi Igbokwe Corruption in Context: A question of
law or normativity?
4:30pm Zoom
10-Nov Nnamdi Igbokwe Corruption’s Comparative Quagmire 4:30pm Zoom
12-Nov Steve Pfaff Mobilization for Democracy in East Germany, 1989 to the Present 12:00pm Zoom
18-Nov James Strickland Constitutional Lobbying: Democratic Dualism and the Mobilization of Interest Groups 10:30am Zoom
18-Nov Nnamdi Igbokwe Social Pandemic and Institutional
Pathology
3:00pm Zoom
18-Nov Heather Hurlburt, Jeannette Haynie and Camille Stewart Diversity in National Security: How to Ensure More Women Hold Leadership Positions (CFW) 5:00pm Zoom
19-Nov Daniel Ziblatt Democracy and Dictatorship in Germany: Lessons for the United States 1:00pm Zoom
2-Dec Fabian Neuner and Mark Ramirez Evaluating Social Norms and Tolerance in the Trump Era 10:30am Zoom
2-Dec Joe Brazda What Now? The Future of the JCPOA and the Iranian Nuclear Program (CFW) 5:30pm Zoom

Spring 2020

Date Speaker Title Time Location
24-Jan PRIEC Conference  TBA TBA
21-Feb Frank Baumgartner Kramer Lecture: "Racial Profiling in US Traffic Stops: Assessing the Evidence" 2:45pm CDN 60
19-Feb Chirasree Mukherjee "Terrorism and Democratic Backsliding: A Case Study of South Asia" 12pm Coor 6607
6-Mar Susan Fransechet "Cabinets, Ministers, and Gender" 10:30am Coor 6607
Postponed Jamon Van Den Hoek "Refugee Camps as Climate Traps?: Current and Future Climate Marginality at One Thousand Refugee Camps" 12pm Coor 5536
Postponed Robert Bond Distinguished Alumni Talk  TBA TBA
Postponed Jenna Bednar TBA TBA TBA
8-Apr Haeyong Lim "Misperception, Redistribution, and Transparency: Does Transparency Increase Redistribution?" 12pm Zoom
Postponed N/A SPGS Scholarship Awards Ceremony 3pm MU 202
Postponed Milan Svolik (Yale)  Warren Miller Jr. Colloquium TBA TBA

Fall 2019

Date Speaker Title Time Location
4-Sep James Strickland "More Women Can Lobby: Explaining Gender Diversity Among Lobbyists in the U.S. States" 12:00pm COOR 6607
18-Sep Namig Abbasov "Individual Preferences on Pro-Western Foreign Policy Orientation: The Evidence from the South Caucasus" 12:00pm COOR 6607
16-Oct Daniel Rothenberg  "Naming Evil: The Meaning, Value and Usefulness of Genocide in International Law" 12:00pm COOR 6607
6-Nov Margaret Hanson Corruption and Governance in Authoritarian Regimes 12:00pm COOR 6607
20-Nov Valery Dzutsati Effects of Anomie and Cultural Distance on Public Attitudes toward Territorial Integrity: Evidence from the South Caucasus 12:00pm COOR 6607

Spring 2019

Date Speaker Title Time Location
10-Jan Michael McQuarrie  "Civil Society and the Ethnonationalist Politics of Trump and Brexit" 12:00pm COOR 6761
18-Jan Scott Mainwaring  "Outcomes of Democratic Transitions" 11:45am COOR 6761
22-Jan Stephen Ansolabehere  "Representation and Accountability, the Constituent’s Perspective" (Kramer Lecture) 3:00pm MU 202
30-Jan Lenka Bustikova "Far Right Parties and Far Right Armed Voluntary Movements in Ukraine: Complements or Substitutes" 12:00pm COOR 6761
1-Feb Sarah Allen Gershon "Shared Identities: The Intersection of Race and Gender and Support for Political Candidates" (Distinguished Alumni) 1:30pm COOR 6761
13-Feb Steve Pfaff "Sectarianism, and Judicial Terror:  The Scottish Witch-Hunt, 1563 - 1736."  12:00pm COOR 6761
22-Feb Lisa Baldez  "Ratification of Human Rights Treaties in the United States" 1:30pm COOR 6761
27-Feb Michael Bernhard "Parties, Civil Society, and the Deterrence of Democratic Defection" (Warren Miller Jr. Colloquium) 12:00pm COOR 6761
15-Mar Kathryn Hendley  "Assessing the Potential for Renegades Among Russian Millennial Lawyers" 2:30pm COOR 6761
20-Mar Jeff Segal "Motivated Cognition on the Bench: Does Criminal Egregiousness Influence Judges’ Admissibility Decisions in Search and Seizure Cases?" 11:30 AM COOR 6761
22-Mar Ben Smith University of Florida TBD TBD
29-Mar Marisa Abrajano “Talking Politics: Political Discussion Networks and the New American Electorate”  2:00pm COOR 6761
10-Apr Valerie Hoekstra Workshop TBD TBD
11-Apr SPGS Awards Ceremony TBD TBD
11-Apr SPGS Social Hour TBD TBD

Fall 2018

Date Speaker Title Time Location
22-Aug Carolyn Warner and Mia Armstrong "Institutional Challenges to Prosecuting Sexual Assault: Assessing the Military, with Evidence from U.S. Bases in Japan" 12:00pm COOR 6761
5-Sep Becki Cordell “Security-civil Liberties Trade-offs: International Cooperation in Extraordinary Rendition” 12:00pm COOR 6761
3-Oct Terri Givens "Immigration and Refugee Policy in the U.S. and Europe - The Impact of Electoral Politics" 12:00pm COOR 6761
17-Oct Milos Popovic "Dictators Cry Too: War and Public Support for Authoritarian Leaders" 12:00pm COOR 6761
26-Oct Political Theory Workshop / Patrick Deneen “The Degradation of Citizenship”  3:00pm COOR 6607
26-Oct Jennifer Cyr "Between Oligarchy and Populism: Democratic Deficiencies in Latin America" 1:00pm COOR 6761
2-Nov Kopf Conference “New Perspectives on Statebuilding”  TBD TBD
9-Nov Political Theory Workshop / Brian Blanchard Political Theory Workshop 3:00pm COOR 6607
14-Nov Glenn Sheriff "Environmental Markets and the Distribution of Pollution"  12:00pm COOR 6761
28-Nov Becki Cordell Workshop 12:00pm COOR 6761

Spring 2018

Date Speaker Title Time Location
12-Jan Fran Hagopian  Workshop on Latin American Politics 12:15pm COOR 6761
17-Jan Becki Cordell  The Political Costs of International Cooperation in Extraordinary Rendition 12:15pm COOR 6761
31-Jan Sarah Shair-Rosenfield "When Change is Good: Estimating the Effects of Electoral Reform on Female Political Representation" 12:30pm COOR 6761
28-Feb See Seng Tan “The ‘IR-ization’ of Asia-Pacific Security” 12:15pm COOR 6761
16-Mar Arturas Rozenas  "Mass Repression and Political Loyalty: Evidence from Stalin's 'Hunger by Terror'"  10:00am COOR 6761
28-Mar Margaret Hanson "Authoritarian Law: Signals from Above"  12:15pm COOR 6761
11-Apr Lenka Bustikova "Why Do Civilians Support Rebels? Evidence from Endorsement Experiments in Dagestan, Russia" 12:15pm COOR 6761
16-Apr Steph Haggard  "Dictators and Democrats: Elites, Masses and Regime Change" 1:30pm COOR 6761
25-Apr Christian Davenport "Starting and Stopping Repressive Spells" 12:15pm COOR 6761

Fall 2017

Date Speaker Title Time Location
6-Sep Henry Thomson "Democratization, Elections and Urban Social Disorder in the Developing World, 1960-2011" 12:15pm COOR 6761
15-Sep Clark Gray Climate Change and Human Migration in South Asia 10:30am COOR 6761
20-Sep Fabian Neuner "Seeing Blue in Black and White: Race and Perceptions of Officer-Involved Shootings" 12:15pm COOR 6761
29-Sep Benjamin Marquez "Social Movements, Philanthropy and Lawyers: MALDEF and Building an Ethnic Identity" 12:30pm COOR 6761
4-Oct Kendall Funk "Representative Budgeting: Women Mayors and the Composition of Spending in Local Governments" 12:15pm COOR 6761
18-Oct Audrey Comstock "Negotiated Rights: Ratification, Accession, and Negotiating United Nations Human Rights Treaties" 12:15pm COOR 6761
25-Oct Victor Peskin "The Human Rights Ideal, the Marginalization of Lesser Crimes, and the Politics of Establishing the New Kosovo Specialist Chambers" 12:15pm COOR 4403
26-Oct Kathleen Thelen The New Precariat: The United States in Comparative Perspective - Kramer Lecture Series Midday COOR 6761
1-Nov Christian Phillips Demographics are (Men's) Destiny: Immigrant Communities and Descriptive Representation in American State Legislatures 12:15pm COOR 6761